water pills

Many people losing weight with phentermine search for ways to increase their weight loss potential by adding supplements like Phen Caps, 5-HTP, and B12 injections to their daily dose of phentermine. Worryingly, it is also becoming more common for phentermine users to take water pills alongside their phentermine prescription thinking that this will increase weight loss. Here we explain why water pills should not be used for weight loss purposes, and why it could be very dangerous to combine water pills with phentermine.

What Are Water Pills?

Water pills, known formally as diuretics, pressure your kidneys to flush out unnecessary water and salt from the body through urine. One of the most commonly prescribed medications, doctors usually give diuretics to people whose bodies are unable to regulate fluid intake. Getting rid of excess salt and fluid helps to lower blood pressure and can make it easier for the heart to pump. So, water pills are often prescribed to patients with heart-related health issues like hypertension, heart disease, and heart failure, as well as other conditions such as liver problems and glaucoma.

Can Water Pills Help Weight Loss?

In a word, no. Despite the commercials you might have seen promoting water pills as a quick slimming solution, they should never be prescribed to people looking to lose weight and keep it off because diuretics have no effect on body fat. The effect produced by water pills is a classic example of how the scale does not represent the whole picture when it comes to weight loss. While it is true that diuretics will flush out water from the body, and could lead to a lower scale reading, this effect is temporary and not an indicator of weight loss. This is because as soon as you stop taking the water pills, your kidneys will go back to absorbing the right amount of water and salt for your body, causing the scale to show your true weight again.

Motivated by a desire to see a lower number on the scale, some people choose to take over-the-counter (OTC) water pills as a means to reduce bloating and drop water weight. It is important to highlight that these OTC diuretics are not the same as those prescribed by doctors. OTC water pills are not regulated by the FDA and may not contain the ingredients they claim to contain. For this reason, many doctors actively discourage patients from taking OTC diuretics as they could easily be misused and cause dangerous side effects.

And, aside from the potentially dangerous side effects of taking water pills, long term usage can actually cause weight gain. Yes, that’s right – weight gain! If you take diuretics over a long period of time (this length of time can vary from person to person), your kidneys eventually start to compensate for their use. Your body ends up retaining more water and sodium in the kidneys than it needs. This then causes the body to swell as a result, a condition known as diuretic-induced edema, which is very difficult to treat.

water pills

Taking Water Pills On Phentermine

On our phentermine forum and in comments on our blogs we have seen an increase in people taking water pills alongside phentermine. If these are prescription diuretics then this would indicate that the patient has problems regulating fluid intake and may have a heart condition. In that case, since phentermine can have negative effects on the heart, it is essential that all doctors treating the patient in question are fully informed that the patient is taking water pills and phentermine, and possibly other medications too. Certain heart problems such as hypertension would usually exclude a patient from being prescribed phentermine, as shown here. Despite this, in cases where the heart condition is under control, doctors will sometimes choose to prescribe phentermine as a means to help the patient lose weight in order to help his or her overall health.

However, several phentermine users have been in touch with us to report that doctors, especially those at weight loss clinics, are prescribing water pills alongside phentermine to boost weight loss results, and not because of any medical need for the diuretics. If you have been prescribed water pills without being fully informed of what they were for, then we would urge you to get in touch with your family doctor to seek further advice.

More worrying is the possibility that phentermine users are choosing to take OTC water pills thinking that it will help them drop weight faster. Taking water pills unnecessarily can lead to dehydration and a loss of electrolytes, which can then cause scary symptoms such as heart palpitations, muscle weakness, dizziness and confusion. And, since OTC diuretics aren’t regulated in any way, it’s hard to say if the recommended dosage on the pack is safe even before you start mixing them with phentermine and the additional side effects it can cause. Phentermine is also a dehydrating drug, shown by the way that it causes dry mouth in the vast majority of people taking it. Combining phentermine and water pills without a doctor’s supervision could be a dangerous mix as you may become severely dehydrated, running the risk of dizziness, fainting and even seizures.

If you’re looking to boost your weight loss results with phentermine then water pills are clearly not the answer. Not only do they not help you to lose fat, they can even cause the kidneys to overcompensate for their use and lead to water retention and swelling. The only way to truly lose weight is by eating more nutritious food to fuel your body well, and by adding more activity to your day to help build muscle and burn fat. Phentermine helps you to do these things by suppressing appetite and boosting your energy levels. However, if you feel that phentermine isn’t helping you as much as you had hoped then adding Phen Caps to your phentermine prescription is a great way of getting your energy levels up and your hunger down, leading to real long-term weight loss.

Are you taking water pills with phentermine? Have you taken water pills in the past? Please let us know by commenting below.

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7 Responses

  1. really great article right here. I really enjoyed reading it, thanks for sharing!

    • Thanks Ben! 😀
      Sally, phentermine.com

  2. I am currently on phentermine and I have lost 21 pounds in two months and about 45 inches. I was prescribed water pills with my prescription also.

    • Hi Shawnessi,
      We’re not saying that taking water pills with phentermine is necessarily dangerous, but that they should be prescribed for a medical reason, not for weight loss. The real danger is people taking OTC water pills as these are not controlled and could cause serious side effects alongside phentermine.
      Sally, phentermine.com

  3. This worries me. The backstory: I had been having difficulty getting my bp under control for about a year, trying different meds until finally finding one that worked pretty well. But then last October (before phen), partly because I went hyperthyroid on my thyroid dosage, I swelled up to 280 lbs overnight with severe edema. My endo changed my thyroid dosage, and my gp changed my bp meds to include a water pill, basically just splitting it out of the bp med I was already taking into a separate pill so he’d have more control. I quickly recovered, lost 15 lbs by the next day, and with this new medication regimen my bp came well under control to the point where he declared me “fixed” (after regular checks) by February. Then in July, my endo urged me to lose weight and gave me phen.

    I’ve been doing well, have lost 20 lbs and my bp is completely fine (I check it regularly on my own). Even kind of on the low side of normal sometimes, but usually right where it’s supposed to be. But I do get kind of dizzy, or “woozy” I call it, often after exercise. I have checked my bp during these episodes of wooziness and it’s usually quite normal, averaging 100/75.

    So I haven’t known whether to talk to my gp about my bp meds or not. I thought my question was going to be, do I need to go off them, but maybe the right question is, should I stop the losartan/chlorthalidone combo? Or might I be just fine with everything?

    I do tend to have a hard time drinking all 8 glasses of water per day. I average about 5.

    • Hi Kelly,
      If your BP is good, you’re losing weight, and apart from some dizzy spells after exercise (which many people get with or without phentermine) then I’d say that your medications are currently working well for you. Of course there’s no harm in checking with your doctor to see if you could do just as well if you stopped, so by all means ask, but it could be that you’re doing so well right now thanks to the meds and coming off them might set you back. This article explaining the danger of taking water pills with phentermine was mainly directed at people who self-medicate, thinking that they will lose extra weight that way, but prescribed water pills obviously do a lot of good for those who are meant to be taking them. As for the not being able to drink 8 glasses of water a day, it’s not a big concern if you are getting other fluids through drinks like tea and foods like melon, watermelon and cucumber. However, if your pee is often dark then this could be a sign of dehydration so you should probably think about increasing your liquid intake in some way. This article offers some tips on how to drink more water: http://www.phen.com/how-to-lose-weight-phen-blog/7-tips-to-drink-more-water
      Hope that helps!
      Sally, phentermine.com

  4. I have too been prescribed water pills along with potassium. One pill each every four days. I have taken phentermine 3 times with the same dosing. I also have learned drinking coconut water or equivalent while taking has helped me. I travel a lot and retain tons of water so I feel that it helps me. I do skip a dose of I’m feeling dehydrated.

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