phentermine affects your heart

On our phentermine forum, there is a lot of speculation about how phentermine affects your heart, with posts on this topic ranging from worrying accounts about heart problems that have been directly attributed to taking phentermine, to posts which confidently state that phentermine cannot cause such problems. But what’s the truth? Here we explain more about how phentermine affects your heart and what side effects to look out for in order to ensure good heart health while you’re taking phentermine.

Phentermine Contraindications

Firstly, it is important to clarify that phentermine is not suitable for everyone, and that is particularly the case if you have ever suffered from heart problems. For this reason, you must always divulge your complete medical history to your doctor before you are prescribed phentermine. You should not take phentermine if you have a history of heart disease, or severe or uncontrolled blood pressure. Phentermine is also not suitable for those with other conditions such as an overactive thyroid, glaucoma, a history of pulmonary hypertension, or if you have a history of drug or alcohol abuse. If you have an appointment with a doctor in order to be prescribed phentermine, you should especially make sure to tell him or her if you have any of the following: high blood pressure, diabetes, kidney disease, a thyroid disorder, or an aspirin allergy. It is vital to disclose all of your medical history and that of any close relatives if the doctor requests this too; even if you think it is unrelated, it is important for your safety that your doctor is properly informed of any potential there may be for a negative reaction to the medication, especially when it comes to heart health.

Before being prescribed phentermine, as well as asking about your medical history, your doctor should test your blood pressure and other indicators of general health, and will only prescribe phentermine if he or she feels that it will not cause additional risks to your health. One phentermine forum user here states that although phentermine may increase the risks of a heart problem, obesity is a guaranteed risk to the heart and your health in general. However, that is not to say that putting your health further at risk by taking something known to be dangerous in your particular case is an option; your doctor should always choose the best course of action for you based on your particular case. Individual differences affect how our bodies metabolize drugs such as phentermine, which is why we all experience different results and different side effects. So, phentermine can only be considered as an option for you if it is deemed safe for you; phentermine has been both effective and safe for many people during its 60 year history and is still the most widely prescribed weight loss medication in the US, but that does not mean that it’s safe for everyone.

If your doctor doesn’t think phentermine is the right option for you, whether it’s due to heart problems or for any other reason, the phentermine alternative Phen Caps can provide you with a solution. Phen Caps do not contain phentermine and have no side effects nor any potential to cause heart problems. In fact, Phen Caps contain crateagus spp. extract, a hawthorn berry extract which is well known for its benefits to cardiovascular health. Hawthorn berries are used in traditional medicine for the treatment of chronic heart failure, high blood pressure, irregular heartbeat, and digestive problems. They have also been shown to improve performance and endurance during exercise, decreasing effects such as shortness of breath and fatigue. In addition to these health-promoting effects, Phen Caps also help you to lose weight in the same way as phentermine by suppressing appetite and boosting energy with its combination of innovative ingredients.

How Phentermine Affects Your Heart

Phentermine works by acting on the central nervous system to stimulate the release of neurotransmitters in our brain, including dopamine, epinephrine (adrenalin) and norepinephrine (noradrenalin). This causes phentermine to reduce appetite and minimize cravings, as well as increasing energy levels and boosting metabolism. However, alongside a faster metabolism, the additional adrenalin is likely to increase your heart rate as a result. This is because there is a direct correlation between heart rate and metabolism – much like when you are working out or scared, your heart rate increases to enable more blood and oxygen to circulate your body and feed your muscles. An accelerated heart rate is therefore considered normal while you are taking phentermine. Furthermore, stress caused by dieting, and phentermine side effects such as anxiety and jitteriness, can also increase your heart rate so it’s important to take steps to de-stress your life and keep healthy by getting all the essential nutrients you need while you’re taking phentermine.

However, if your heartbeat becomes irregular or skips a beat, or if you experience any kind of pain or discomfort, especially in your arms or chest, then you should contact your doctor immediately. Due to the way it is metabolized by the body, phentermine does put additional pressure on the heart and it is for this reason that it cannot be taken by anyone with existing heart problems, and why caution should be exercised if you have conditions such as high blood pressure, as phentermine can exacerbate such issues. There is no good correlation between pulse rate and blood pressure, but an increase in blood pressure is also a possible side effect of phentermine. If you are worried about an increase in blood pressure then you should consult your doctor who will be able to tell you if the increase you are experiencing is within the normal range or not.

phentermine affects your heart

Even if you think that you have a healthy heart or have never experienced problems or symptoms before, it is essential to be vigilant as heart problems can present themselves at any time. Furthermore, several phentermine forum members have explained that they had never had heart problems prior to taking phentermine but experienced serious heart problems either after or while taking phentermine, such as sinus arrhythmia and seizures, and were informed by their doctors that these issues were as a direct result of taking phentermine. While it’s not certain whether these phentermine users actually had undetected heart problems or not, it is certain that the way in which phentermine affects your heart means that symptoms of heart problems can arise seemingly from nowhere while you are taking it.

It is unfortunate that some forum members have been incorrectly reassured by doctors that phentermine does not cause heart problems, as this forum member found when she was later given the opposite information by another doctor. If you are ever concerned or unsure about something that you have been told by your doctor, it is advisable to get a second opinion where possible, as your health should always be yours and your doctor’s priority. Some forum members also dismiss the idea that phentermine causes heart problems and state that it is only the now banned phentermine combination, Fen Phen, which caused these types of issues. While it is true that Fen-Phen and fenfluramine – the other ingredient of the combination – are both banned, whereas phentermine continues to be prescribed, that is not to say that phentermine alone cannot cause heart problems. The number and severity of the health problems caused by Fen-Phen were far beyond reported cases of heart problems linked to phentermine alone, but these cases do still exist, which is why you should be vigilant about side effects and symptoms while taking phentermine.

Phentermine Side Effects Indicative Of Heart Problems

Phentermine comes with a variety of side effects; some of the most common include dry mouth, anxiety, insomnia, constipation, nausea and mood swings. But, in addition to these uncomfortable but otherwise less serious side effects, phentermine can also cause side effects which are cause for concern, such as fainting, swelling across the body, and psychosis. These types of more serious side effects are listed in full here, and should be reported to your doctor immediately. Of the list, those which could indicate heart issues include shortness of breath, a racing heartbeat, irregular heartbeat, dizziness and fainting, arm pain, chest pains, and an elevated blood pressure reading.

Several members on the phentermine forum have posted that they have experienced stabbing chest pains, including this thread, where the forum member states that she is afraid to tell her doctor about the chest pains in case he stops her phentermine prescription. We would like to stress that this is a very reckless and dangerous way to view your health; side effects like these cannot be ignored and should certainly not be hidden from your doctor. Even if you think you have no heart problems, due to the way phentermine affects your heart, you may begin to experience side effects from a previously undetected issue. The phentermine forum includes posts from phentermine users who have developed serious heart problems and have been told by their doctors that it is as a direct result of taking phentermine, such as this member, who speaks about the possibility of being fitted with a pacemaker due to having developed an irregular heartbeat. She states that all the doctors she has seen agree that this is due to phentermine, since she had no heart problems prior to starting phentermine. While it’s possible that she may have had an undetected heart problem, this also highlights the fact that in some cases, phentermine is prescribed to patients whose previously undetected problem with no symptoms then converts into a very serious heart problem due to the ways in which phentermine affects your heart. She lists her symptoms as palpitations, dizziness, short sharp chest pains, shortness of breath and arm pain, and urges that anyone who is experiencing similar symptoms goes to their doctor straight away.

The bottom line is, although phentermine is generally a safe medication when prescribed to obese individuals with otherwise good overall health, any serious side effects should be reported immediately to your doctor. This is particularly the case if you experience any pains or symptoms that may indicate that your heart is at risk due to the way in which phentermine affects your heart. If you are obese, losing weight is the best thing you can do for your health and for your heart, but risking your health and possibly your life to lose weight is not worth it.

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22 Responses

  1. I am slightly concerned because occasionally I suffer from anxiety for which I take Diazipam(Valium). I do not want this to affect the taking of phentermine on my system or make my anxiety worse. I have no heart problems or high blood pressure (my issues are emotional with regard to anxiety). Once I get to my optimum weight I will stop taking phentermine, I only need to really lose 18lbs. I am aware to not take them in conjunction with caffeine because this will just make me feel jittery. I will listen to my body and if i think it\’s having an adverse affect then i will stop taking it or maybe just not take it every day.

    It is worthy to not that I have taken what was said to be Chinese herbal diet tablets, they stated there would be no side affects however the affects on my body were quite severe, I did lose weight but constantly felt Jittery. I\’m convinced they contained speed because it gave me terrible skin and all i wanted to do was drink coffee and smoke cigarettes.

    I would just like to make sure that the use of my Valium won\’t conflict with the taking of Phentermine? Also I do like to have a bottle of wine at the weekend and what is the significance of taking alcohol while on Phentermine?

    Thanks

    • Hi Liz, thanks for your questions. We actually just published an article about taking medications with phentermine, so here’s the link for that: http://www.phentermine.com/blog/can-i-take-medications-with-phentermine/. The article mainly stresses the importance of asking your doctor before combining medications with phentermine, so this would be something that you’d have to ask him or her about. Did you ask about this at the time you were given your phentermine prescription? And, if you have two different doctors prescribing these two medications, it would also be advisable to ask your other doctor so you have two opinions to go by.

      In response to your question about phentermine and alcohol, we have also published an article about this: http://www.phentermine.com/blog/need-know-phentermine-alcohol/. Alcohol slows down weight loss by putting pressure on the liver and also weakens the effects of phentermine by increasing the acidity of your urinary pH, so it is advisable to try and drink less alcohol in order to maximize your potential to lose weight with phentermine.

      Hope that helps!
      Sally, phentermine.com

      • Sally

        There is no correlation between pulse and blood pressure? Huh?

        Ever heard of this?:

        CO = HR x SV

        HR goes up so does CO. And only two things affect blood pressure: CO and resistance.

        So, there is a huge correlation between pulse and blood pressure.

  2. When is the best time of day to take phentermine?
    Is Phendimetrazin 35 mg tabs the same as above?
    thank you

    • Hi Linda,
      Phendimetrazine is similar to phentermine – it works in the same way and has similar side effects. However, phendimetrazine can be taken more than once a day while phentermine is only taken once per day. Phentermine is best taken first thing in the morning, before eating. However, we don’t know if the same applied to phendimetrazine so you would have to ask your doctor about this.
      Sally, phentermine.com

  3. Hi, I am a marathoner, and I have BINGE disorder. My doctor prescribed Phentermine 37mg to be taken once a day, but every time I go for a fast run, my heart rate goes sky high! Of course I cannot sustain my usual speeds with a HR of 190, when at the same speed but without Phentermine my HR is 175.
    I want to lose some more weight, but I am not willing to sacrifice my marathon times because of an unusually high HR. (My AVG resting HR is 55, now on Phentermine is 70)

    Should I stop taking it? Any other alternative appetite suppressors that does not cause an increase in my HR?

    Thank you!

    • Hi John,
      You should speak to your doctor before stopping to take phentermine. He or she may be able to recommend an alternative, or if not, we recommend the phentermine alternative Phen Caps which suppress appetite and boost energy with no increase in heart rate or any other side effects. You can find out more about how they work here: http://www.phen.com/how-to-lose-weight-phen-blog/how-do-phen-caps-work
      Sally, phentermine.com

  4. I have taken Phentermine for five weeks with good results. I have been checking my blood pressure regularly–no concerns. The second week I was taking it, I had an exam for life insurance purposes. Just received a call from the insurance company stating that the level of proBPN in my blood was 214. Anything over 150 kicks me into a higher risk category as there is a link with heart failure if proBPN is elevated. Is this something that may have been caused by Phentermine? Past bloodwork did not test for proBPN so I have no way of knowing what the level was before beginning to take Phentermine. I have, of course, called my family doctor who prescribed Phentermine and am waiting for his response.

    • Hi Lynne,
      It’s certainly possible that phentermine has increased your proBPN level, as it can affect the heart in other ways, not just in relation to blood pressure. Hopefully your doctor can explain more to you and help you in some way to reduce your levels.
      Sally, phentermine.com

  5. I have just started taking phentermine, as I can’t seem to keep a steady weight, been gaining a lot after my heart attack in September 2015, I am on Brilinta, losartan, metoprolol, pravastatin, and now got prescribed phentermine and amlodipine, I noticed that my pulse is elevated, laying between 115-120 but have a good blood pressure 108/75, I am worried now when I read this article, that it’s too much for my heart after the heart attack and stent put in

    • Hi Gertie,
      If your doctor has prescribed phentermine then he or she must think that it´s safe for you. That said, you will need to be extra vigilant when it comes to side effects and how you feel. Be sure to keep your doctor informed of any changes or effects which concern you in any way. Good luck!
      Sally, phentermine.com

  6. Hi I started taking this drug before , I had no problem I had missed my appt after my 3 month follow up ,I just went back I started taking it again it give me bad heart burn I took 3 different heartburn meds still is not reliefs it should I stop taking Phentermine I had no hearts problem.

    • Hi Pat,
      Heartburn isn’t typically a side effect of phentermine – are you sure it’s not something more serious like chest pain, as that is a serious side effect of phentermine. If you’re worried or with a lot of discomfort then we would advise you to speak to your doctor. If it is heartburn it is more likely to be related to the food you’re eating. It’s best to eat slowly and take your time to really chew your food. You should also avoid foods that aggravate heartburn, such as alcohol, spicy food, chocolate, citrus fruits, coffee, soda, peppermint and tomatoes.
      Hope that helps!
      Sally, phentermine.com

  7. I was taking Phentermine for 4 years off and on… I am a professional truck driver. Last year I had an episode of supraventricular tachycardia. I was taking HCG shots and drinking protein shakes with 30 or more grams of protein. I have went from a weight of 230 pounds to 270 in the last year. I am at my heaviest weight ever. I am now taking Toprol 25 which is a beta blocker, not for high blood pressure. I take a multivitamin and after my last episode I was told I had low magnesium so I take a multivitamin for that too. I was given metformin but it does not work with the weight loss like Phentermine did. I wanted to know if I can take something else to help with my weight loss again that does not speed up my heart rate. I have never had any heart issues. I was always healthy, I’ve never had high blood pressure, diabetes or any other health issues.

    • Hi NaKeisha,
      Unfortunately most diet pills affect the heart and are not suitable for people who have experienced any kind of related problem. We recommend a non-prescription weight loss supplement called Phen Caps which have no side effects and no health risks. They also contain the ingredient hawthorn berry extract, which is used in traditional medicine for the treatment of chronic heart failure, high blood pressure, irregular heartbeat, and digestive problems, so they can actually help with heart issues. Here is a link for you to find out more about Phen Caps: http://www.phen.com/phencaps
      Sally, phentermine.com

    • The best result I ever had with weight loss is the HMR DIET! My Cardiologist hughlt recommended it. I started last Tuesday..and lost 7 pounds. You eat all the time. Phase 1…no grocery shopping..except fruits a veggies.. You pay for the food and its tasty. Google it. I honestly can’t do the diet drug..as I have the same thing you do.

  8. I have been taking adipex for several weeks and I have taken it in the past and I get coldness going down my right arm. My arms seem to be mottled and discolored on the upper arm. Not sure if this a side effect of adipex.

    • Hi Dawn,
      While what you are describing doesn’t sounds like a side effect of phentermine, if you are concerned about it then you should speak to your doctor, if only for some peace of mind that it is nothing to worry about.
      Sally, phentermine.com

  9. I have taken phentermine before and lost 70 pounds. I stopped taking for a year, had my gallbladder removed, holidays came and basically gained 40 lbs back. So now I am back on it. I have always had normal / low blood pressure, but always higher end of normal heart rate. I have been back on phentermine for about a week now. My blood pressure is in its normal ranges. My heart rate is higher though. I know that it can increase heart rate, but I guess my question is, with a normal high heart rate ranging 90-110, is it that big of a deal for me? I would think not if it’s only increased by 20 to 30… all lab work is normal and no health issues, besides weight, I’m a healthy 35 year old…

  10. Are these side effects seen immediately or over long term use? My Dr. Seems to think I only need to use it for a month.

    • Hi Kassandra,
      It depends on the person – some healthy people with no history of heart problems have developed heart issues within short periods of time on phentermine, while other people take phentermine for much longer and never experience these types of side effects. It’s always best to trust your doctor’s advice if he or she is erring on the side of caution.
      Sally, phentermine.com

  11. Hello all,

    I just thought that I’d weigh in, so to speak, on the effects of phentermine. My doctor prescribed it for me as I had high cholesterol and was probably 40 lbs overweight and was concerned that I would develop heart problems as a result. Well after taking phentermine for several months and losing weight (approx 35 lbs) I did, in fact, develop heart problems. I had a heart attack! This was in 2008! I am grateful that there was very minimal damage and that I have successfully changed my lifestyle and exercise regularly. However, I firmly believe that this cardiac event was directly attributed to the use of this drug as I did not have a family history of heart disease on either side.

    Please consider other options IMHO.

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